~ vamps ~ jamms ~ grooves ~

~ a four bar phrase ~ 2 chord ~ ~ ~ vamps 2 chord hits ~

~ vamp lines ~ & ~ space jams ~

'... getting some miles out of a couple of pitches and a couple of chords ...'

One to Four / major
One to Four / minor
a minor sustain / A D E

non dominant loops /

reggae Db- A maj triad to Ab

di
di
di
too late to turn back now
A- D7 oye como va
good lovin'

'from children's songs and folk into bluegrass, country and the blues, on through to reggae, rock, hip hop, rap and pop then off to jazz ...'

 

styles
b
12 blues
h
h
subdivide

14 maj min 154 124 164 etc maj and min

In a nutshell. The American jazz artists generally plays through the changes. Each new chord in the progression a new opportunity for coolness. And it just so happens that hearing the changes can also be the basis of the evolution through both the historical thus theoretical ascension through the tones. Their numerical representations the easy part.

. Bored with your own playing? Cool, you've come to the right place. For now the inner urge is in place to energize the searching that lives in all of the master crafts must do.

. . It's one aspect of the challenge that the music and art can provide. It's supernatural for the artist to have to evolve their way through the .

You need a thing in life to be passionate about.

.

inner urge

Vamps / 12 bar blues 1 oclock jump

54321 / 54b321 / 54321. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

Vamps / styles. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

Making the bar lines go away. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

Behind a soloist. TO build that chorus ...

. Example 1.

Dukes jungle. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

3625. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

Samba. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

Montuno. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

Chromatic is the first evolution / used as a cell into jazz. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

 

With this technique Duane built climaxed solo's that can almost make your hair stand up. It's oftentimes in this repetition of a few notes or musical phrase where we can most clearly hear the rhythmic pull of the melody pitches against the 2 and 4 of the drumming that creates Duane's unique sense of a very hard driving swing. One of many Allman Brothers tunes to spin to hear his sense of time and swing is ?????.

Review. Here at Essentials, at the core of our American rhythms lives an accented pulse on the 2nd and 4th beats of a measure of 4 / 4 time. We can find this pulse somewhere in every conceivable musical style and their myriad of sub genres. By accenting the 2 and 4, we create a sense of 'pull' away from and towards the downbeat pulse of each measure. It is believed here that in this pulling or stretching of musical time is where the magic of the American swing thing happens.

We can learn to rhythmically swing by singing our melody lines and getting them to capture the essence of our own unique sense of time. We then only have to transfer these ideas to our guitars. Quarter and eighth notes are the swing note values. Even 8th's are perhaps Latin derived and also swing just fine in other styles, although in a bit more of a modern sense perhaps than the traditional 8th note / triplet feel so common of the early Jazzer's of the first half of the last century. And perhaps it's best to simply remember that ...

Silent Architecture
The organic and historical origins of our pitches.
Loops of Pitches
Examining the unbreakable loop of our pitches.
Groups of Pitches / Evolution of Scales
Examining the Yin / Yang our our musical system.
Major / Minor tonality Our groups become our musical scales.
Evolving Scales into Arpeggios
How our scales become arpeggios.
Evolving Arpeggios into Chords
How our arpeggios become chords.
Evolution of Tuning Tuning of pure pitch into modern musical tones.

I'm always thinking about creating. My future starts when I wake up every morning ... Every day I find something creative to do with my life.

Miles Davis
Footnotes:

(1) Isacoff, Stuart. Temperament ... The Idea That Solved Music's Greatest Riddle, p. 40-42. USA Alfred A. Knopf, New York. 2001

(2)Aebersold, Jamey and Slone, Ken. The Charlie Parker Omnibook. New York: Atlantic Music Corp., 1978.

'It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing ...'

Duke Ellington