~ rhythm notation ~

~ learn to read rhythms ~

~ writing music ~

~ subdivision of the beat ~

'... measuring musical time with symbols ...'

he truthhe truth
blues rub
he truth
he truth
clap rhythms
subdivision

In a nutshell. The core of the following discussions is centered on developing the understanding to interpret the notation symbols and developing the ability to hand clap the notated rhythms. That if can clap it out the rhythm of a written line, chances are we've got another way to understand, read and write our music.

2 and 4
pull of swing

Here's some help. According to the lovely recording strains of the 'Count Basie Orchestra', quarter notes swing the hardest, so that's where this discussion starts with the ancient quarter notes. This first idea surely goes all the way back in our collective memories.

Hey ya ya ya ya ya yaya old Indian chant. Example 1.

Carl

YESTERDAY.

. According to the lovely recording strains of the 'Count Basie Orchestra, quarter notes swing the hardest, so that's where this discussion starts with the ancient quarter notes. This first idea surely goes all the way back in our collective memories. Example 1.

Carl

Time signatures.

Common. This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

60
160

Metronome markings.

: This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

60
160

Saints.

: This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation

8th's.

: This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation

Gallop / an 8th note triplet.

: This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation

Quarter note / big four.

: This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation

subdivision

Metronome markings.

: This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

60
160
numerical scale degrees
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
two octave C major scale
C
D
E
F
G
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
A
B
C
arpeggio degrees
1
.
3
.
5
.
7
.
9
.
11
.
.
.
15
C major arpeggio
C
.
E
.
G
.
B
.
D
.
F
.
.
.
C

'A half step above our tonic pitch.'

Theory names: This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation