~ supplemental songs ~

'... if every picture tells a story then ... surely every song has a tale to tell ...'

 

"Spooky"

"Layla"
"Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain"

wiki ~ the Global Jukebox / Alan Lomax

https://theglobaljukebox.org

 

 

 

'the portal color into the whole Americana harmony tamale ...'

.

In a nutshell. The theory only gets us so far along here for we still have to hear its components in action. In this way we get a truer sense of the art they can create. The following songs are wiki suggestions for the theorist to explore, each providing the needed polished closure of completed and presented works of art ~ songs to our learning process.

Listed mostly alphabetically, there's a brief description of the theory coolness in its writing that gets it on this list. Dr. Miller used to say that songs became a 'standard' because "it has that special 'something' that makes it unique on its own accord." As theorists, we just want to find that 'something' and know its theories :) As this is an ever evolving list and we all have our faves, please feel free to submit additional songs and why they belong on this list. For we each can share here the cool we find in the 'standards' we each dig for the intellectual benefit of all who read here. Cool?

closure
wiki links
Dr. Miller
a 'standard' song

Hearing this music. In today's modern world of audio wizardy we each have our ways to hear music. And as they used to say in the old days ... search and yee shall find.

search
"Land Of Make Believe"
samba bass line

wiki ~ Land of Make Believe (Chuck_Mangione_album)

"Phase Dance"
samba bass line

wiki ~ Land of Make Believe (Chuck_Mangione_album)

"The Tennesse Waltz"
samba bass line

wiki ~ Land of Make Believe (Chuck_Mangione_album)

theory
style
history

 

   

 

 

 

"Johnny B. Goode" Chord progression of One, Three to Four

 

The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four

 

"Misty." Chord progression of One, Three to Four

 

"Here's That Rainy Day." Chord progression of One, Three to Four

 

"I Let A Song Go Out Of My Heart." Chord progression of One, Three to Four

 

"Pride And Joy" Big quarter notes on the beat.

 

"Satin Doll." Chord progression of One, Three to Four

 

"Shotgun." One chord

Just a list. The songs included here are the ones included in the discussions throughout the text. In alphabetical order, each song has a brief description of why 'in theory' it is included here. The most common reason is there's probably a glaring example of a theory component in the song. There's three basic categories here to navigate; by theory, styles and history by decade, and all manner of bookmarks for the links coming in generated by the theory discussions.

theory
style

Three chords and the truth: Need a dozen or so ...

Blue Eyes Cryin'

Workingman's hero

Blowing in the Wind / other dylan

Watchtower

Oh Darling

Helpless / Neil Young

 

ow that we have created an overview of our musical resource including its origins and perfect closure, let's pause a bit and sure up the theory and sounds of major and minor, our primary musical colors. For from this point forward in our theory discussions, nearly everything will include either one or both of these core sounds.

primary colors
style

folk

blues rock country pop jazz
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
Giant Steps Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four

 

 

 

 

 

The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four
The Weight Chord progression of One, Three to Four

Jump stylings. Made a staple by the Kansas City bands of the 30's the 'jump'style is a dancers delight. Based on the major 6th chord, simply a triad and added major 6th interval, there's no limit to the infectious joy that this music has created.

"Jumping At The Woodside"

'Sus 4" chords / "Pinball Wizard." Made a staple by the Kansas City bands of the 30's the 'jump'style is a dancers delight. Based on the major 6th chord, simply a triad and added major 6th interval, there's no limit to the infectious joy that this music has created.

"Jumping At The Woodside"

Dorian compositions. Made a staple by the Kansas City bands of the 30's the 'jump'style is a dancers delight. Based on the major 6th chord, simply a triad and added major 6th interval, there's no limit to the infectious joy that this music has created.

"Jumping At The Woodside"

Overview: .

primary colors

Augmented colors. Now that we have created an overview of our musical resource including its origins and perfect closure, let's pause a bit and sure up the theory and sounds of major and minor, our primary musical colors. For from this point forward in our theory discussions, nearly everything will include either one or both of these core sounds.

"Oh Darling"
"Stormy Monday Blues"

Diminished colors. Now that we have created an overview of our musical resource including its origins and perfect closure, let's pause a bit and sure up the theory and sounds of major and minor, our primary musical colors. For from this point forward in our theory discussions, nearly everything will include either one or both of these core sounds.

"Spooky"

"Giant Steps." Now that we have created an overview of our musical resource including its origins and perfect closure, let's pause a bit and sure up the theory and sounds of major and minor, our primary musical colors. For from this point forward in our theory discussions, nearly everything will include either one or both of these core sounds.

Two / Five One. Now that we have created an overview of our musical resource including its origins and perfect closure, let's pause a bit and sure up the theory and sounds of major and minor, our primary musical colors. For from this point forward in our theory discussions, nearly everything will include either one or both of these core sounds.

"Oh! Darling"
otr

Three chords and the truth: Need a dozen or so ...

Blue Eyes Cryin'

Workingman's hero

Blowing in the Wind / other dylan

Oh Darling

Helpless / Neil Young

 

ow that we have created an overview of our musical resource including its origins and perfect closure, let's pause a bit and sure up the theory and sounds of major and minor, our primary musical colors. For from this point forward in our theory discussions, nearly everything will include either one or both of these core sounds.

primary colors
otr

Augmented colors: Need a dozen or so ...

Blue Eyes Cryin'

Workingman's hero

Blowing in the Wind / other dylan

ow that we have created an overview of our musical resource including its origins and perfect closure, let's pause a bit and sure up the theory and sounds of major and minor, our primary musical colors. For from this point forward in our theory discussions, nearly everything will include either one or both of these core sounds.

primary colors
otr

Judy Garland. This next musical idea goes wayback to the later 1500's to locate probably what was the top 40 hit of the 16th century. Luckily for us "Greensleeves" has not only survived but has thrived and still today is an inspirational song to so many of us.

Harold Arlen

top 40
wes

Wes Montgomery. This next musical idea goes wayback to the later 1500's to locate probably what was the top 40 hit of the 16th century. Luckily for us "Greensleeves" has not only survived but has thrived and still today is an inspirational song to so many of us.

wayback
top 40

Into the wayback machine. This next musical idea goes wayback to the later 1500's to locate probably what was the top 40 hit of the 16th century. Luckily for us "Greensleeves" has not only survived but has thrived and still today is an inspirational song to so many of us.

wayback
top 40

As musicians we dig a most poignant melody line to interpret. As theorists we marvel at the balance of two distinct melodic phrases that aurally bring to life the passion of the words, one each in our yin/yang ~ major/minor dichotomy. Know this tune? No? Surely a good time to learn another classic line. Cool with the idea of 3/4 time and how it all works? Example 1.

phrasing
dichotomy
3/4 time

Well? Which phrase is which? Those in the know of course do know. The first phrase is in the minor tonality. The second phrase, starting at measure 10, is in the major tonality with the sounding of the D major chord. The music then cycles downward diatonically before closing in measure 17 back in E minor. And can you hear which melody is major or minor? Perhaps try and google / Wes Montgomery / Greensleeves / to hear the Greensleeves magic come to life.

cycles
diatonic

Melody and chords. Let's look at the first two bars of the tune and see what we have there. One sharp in the key signature puts us in E minor / G major. Example 2.

bar
  key signature
E minor/G major

Seven theory discussions of 'Essentials.' Here are links to the seven broad discussions of music theory within this text.

silent architecture

the organic and historical origins of our pitches

loops of pitches

examining the unbreakable loop of our pitches

major /minor tonality

examining the Yin / Yang balance of our system

groups of pitches

evolving our musical scales

scales into arpeggios

how our scales become arpeggios

arpeggios into chords

how our arpeggios become chords

evolution of tuning

the evolution of our tuned musical pitches

'They who conquer others are strong, those who conquer themselves are mighty.'

Lao Tzu

Footnotes:

(1) Appel, Willie and Ralph T. Daniel. The Harvard Brief Dictionary Of Music. New York: Pocket Books, a Simon and Schuster Division of Gulf and Western, 1960

(2) Ottman, Robert. Elementary Harmony, Second Edition, p. 4-7. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1970.

(3) Isacoff, Stuart. Temperament ... The Idea That Solved Music's Greatest Riddle, p. 210. U.S.A. Alfred A. Knopf, New York. 2001

(4) To find "middle C", sit at the middle of the piano, extend your arms outward to touch the furthest keys you can, then bend from the waist and bring your nose to gently touch the keys. The closest "C" is probably "middle C."

(5) Ottman, Robert. Advanced Harmony, Theory and Practice, Second Edition, p. 272- 298. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1970.

(6) Ottman, Robert. Elementary Harmony, Second Edition, p. 8. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1970.

sans le tritone: My French language version of "without a tritone."

(1) Ottman, Robert. Elementary Harmony, First Edition, p. 4. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1970.

(2) Isacoff, Stuart. Temperament ... The Idea That Solved Music's Greatest Riddle. U.S.A. Alfred A. Knopf, New York. 2001. The theme of this wonderful book explores the historical struggle to conquer the process and implementation of equal temper tuning within European society. For those that need to get to the historical core of the evolution of our tuning, "Temperament" weaves a fun, fascinating and researched historical perspective.

(1) Appel, Willie and Ralph T. Daniel. The Harvard Brief Dictionary Of Music, p. 221. New York: Pocket Books, a Simon and Schuster Division of Gulf and Western, 1960. 

Aebersold, James and Slone, Ken. Charlie Parker Omnibook. New York: Atlantic Music Corp., 1978. I know this is a troubling stand to take but I felt I had to and as jazz player, I based it on Charlie Parker's compositions in the Omnibook. Find a copy, count the number of tunes, then compare the number of major key to minor key songs. Any real book of popular American song, by a mix of composers, will follow along similar lines in this regard.regard.

(Y) Visit YouTube to see Johnny working his magic. In most of the clips his guitar is capo'd at the first fret or he's tuned up his ax a half step to better match his voice I'd imagine. Either way the chord voicing for "Folsom Prison Blues" is the open E as in example 2c above. The character of the tune to experienced ears, especially that bass lick moving south at the end of the phrase is clearly an open E major chord. And while there are often other ways to find the same pitches on the guitar, although that is not the case here, when we hear such a character sound as "Folsom Prison Blues", we know that there is only one way to get that sound. No other E major chord rings like the open chord E major, it's just the nature of the animal.

 

In a nutshell. Thinking that the melody of a song can clearly define the emotional character of the story being told, we look here to examine ideas and create ways to to play melodies by ear. That by doing so we can build up and strengthen our own artistic abilities to interpret melodies and project our take or interpretation of a song's story line.

Overview. From the old as the hills artistic technique often termed 'a theme and its variations', an artistic concept and philosophy which also applies to many of our art disciplines; musics, sculpt, painting, writing etc., this theme and variations is the basis of so much of what American improv is about, where the music being performed is played by ear. That traditionally our musics are not being read as they are being performed.

theme and variations

Songs by key center. Made a staple by the Kansas City bands of the 30's the 'jump'style is a dancers delight. Based on the major 6th chord, simply a triad and added major 6th interval, there's no limit to the infectious joy that this music has created.

"Jumping At The Woodside"

C major compositions. Made a staple by the Kansas City bands of the 30's the 'jump'style is a dancers delight. Based on the major 6th chord, simply a triad and added major 6th interval, there's no limit to the infectious joy that this music has created.

"Jumping At The Woodside"